Events

Metanoia
‘Metanoia’ by Mark and Paula Sutherland

©Mark Sutherland

This somatic landscape imprinted by place
it bears the scars of all who reside here
our language invisible beneath the surface of this skin
cannot silence the whispers of our ancestors
who call us to recognise the past
which will determine your future
but silence them I will as the present is full of lies
as there is no power in truth only momentary liberation
before the body is shackled by your gaze and you look
upon this landscape to make your judgements
allowing your prejudices to seep into this space
polluting the dialogic connections as you seek
no thing and find no thing only the roots to our politics
which imprison ideas until our bodies are beaten down
by the structure of self and others but still
your scopophilic judgements make me weep
the tears of many that there is still no change to see
and you are a fool to believe the past is invisible
as it roars around my skin and yet you do not hear
as I tell you all stories are here scratched across the body
as it journeys to others and grips the present
urging us to believe that theirs is a finite truth
and power is dressed up as order so that we morph
into one collective amnesia and pretend it never was
© Paula Sutherland

Photos: Mark Sutherland
Text: Paula Sutherland

Pop-up show
Lisa O Donnell Projection Aug 24th-Sept 15th

For the weekend of August 24th-Sept 15th we will have a pop-up show by Lisa O Donnell in the foyer of the gallery space.

‘Slip’, video animation, 1 min 43 sec: ‘Slip’ is a collection of video clips from 1980’s news footage from Ireland. They are knitted together using digital manipulation, painterly animation and a jumpy soundtrack to make one hybrid work. These images are of particular interest because they represent for the artist, a tension and issues that occurred during the 80’s that have like history repeated itself in the present day; deep recession, general public unrest and empty political promises.

Jennifer Kidd

Still from ‘Noose’ animation by Jennifer Kidd

For the final week of Marathon Irish, Jennifer Kidd will install her work ‘Noose’ at Dialogue. The work will be on view from Thursday 13th September until Sunday 16th September 5pm.

‘Noose’ is a stop motion video installation, which is a narrative and nightmarish
device that examines notions of loss of identity, ill-being and perdition. At first
glance, the film appears innocuous: two little girls wearing green dresses arrive,
sit down and start to knit what seems to be a scarf.

Kidd continues her preoccupation more generally focusing on the individual who
erases little by little inside the collective, where the subject becomes an ‘I’ broken
and lost trying to express his real identity among the mass. In fact, these girls are
not twins, they are their own negative image, an avatar, a double – or a clone –
questioning their identities. Between simplicity and strangeness, Kidd inspires a
form of dispersion and social perdition, witness of our nowadays, inside a surreal
and tortured universe with distance and freedom.

September Events
September 6th-8th Irish Book Cover Design

Niall Mc Cormack will be installing an exhibit of Irish Book Cover Design from 1922-1970 in the space on First Thursday 6th September.  The pop-up show will stay in place until Saturday 8th Sept. in the evening.

Irish Book Cover Design, 1922 – 1972

While Ireland is known for its strong literary tradition, its visual culture is less highly thought of and much of it is overlooked. Book cover art is a rich, yet uncelebrated, vein of Irish visual history which converges with the literary tradition. Illustrator and designer Niall McCormack will present a selection of Irish book cover designs from the first fifty years of Irish independence.

Included will be examples of cover art for fiction, poetry, history and Irish language titles from the main publishers active in Ireland at the time: The Talbot Press, Helicon, Dolmen, Gill & Son, Mercier, Allen Figgis, Riverrun, Dundalgan, Clonmore & Reynolds, Browne & Nolan, The Sign of the Three Candles, An Gúm, Oifig an tSolathair, FNT, Sáirséal agus Dill and Cló Morainn.

The illustrated book jacket came of age in the 1920s and Irish publishers were quick to pick up on the trend. The early examples embrace the bold and colourful style popular at the time. Olive Cunningham, M. A. Keane, Mícheál MacLiammóir, AÓM (Austin Ó Maolaoid), V. Penny and G. A. (George Altendorf) trained as illustrators rather than graphic designers but were fully capable of integrating hand lettering and illustration to achieve a successful whole.

Later covers were created by two distinct groups – graphic designers (Cor Klaasen, William Bolger, Karl Uhlemann) and other visual artists who wouldn’t consider themselves to be commercial artists (Paul Funge, Anne Yeats, Muiris MacCongail, Patrick Scott, Gabriel Hayes, Fergus O’Ryan, Seán O’Sullivan).

 

Saturday 8th September Ronan Sheehan and Philip Casey

On Saturday September 8th we have two renowned Irish writers and thinkers coming to discuss their work and related topics. This talk begins at 3pm and finishes around 5pm.

Philip  Casey will read a short passage from his novel The Water Star, which is set in East and North London in the 1950s, as a preface to  musing about his early childhood years in London before his family moved to Wexford in Ireland.So he was born in London but feels (and probably acts) 100% Irish. Why is that, especially as he also feels a citizen of the world? Is it a sense of place? Is it what in Irish is called Dindshenchas, or Dinnseanachais,  from dind “notable place”, and  senchas “old tales, ancient history, tradition”. Is that notion obsolete  or in the contemporary global consciousness is it vital to know the story of the ground we walk on every day?

 

Ronan Sheehan is a writer and lawyer who specialises in copyright law.  Copyright law is conventionally dated to The Statute Of Queen Anne in 1709. The law of Saint Colmcille comes the Brehon tradition of law – Irish law as opposed to common law- and may derive from the the sixth century dispute between himself and Saint Finnian over the entitlement to copy the psalms.Ronan will consider this tradition.

See link attached on issues of intellectual property http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6Z6CvLi9QM

 

Sept 8th 8pm John Stephenson in conversation with Mannix Flynn

Mannix Flynn and John Stephenson will be in conversation on Saturday September 8th at 8pm – All Welcome

John Stephenson who operated as Artistic director and Chief Executive Officer of ‘A Sense of Ireland’ will be in conversation with Mannix Flynn on Saturday 8th September at 8pm.

About ‘A Sense of Ireland’
The festival was initiated, conceived and delivered by artists and arts workers. Governmental agencies in Dublin, London and Belfast were steadily drawn in during the two years of preparation, to provide funding and support. By the time the festival opened it had the appearance of an official cultural promotion, with Government Ministers and Ambassadors publicly involved and with contributions from the British Council, the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and – primarily – the Department of Foreign Affairs Cultural Relations Committee (now Culture Ireland). Indeed, the CRC provided the seed funding and ultimately, the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs picked up the lion’s share of the tab. But at no stage did any of these have any input into the programme or organization, which was run by a separate and independent non-profit company set up for that purpose. A Sense of Ireland was a ‘ground up’ arts endeavour.

But that’s not to say that the whole project was not highly political from beginning to end, with enormous pressures being brought to bear from every conceivable source. A Sense of Ireland took place in the teeth of a war. Anglo Irish relations were at their most dreadful point since the War of Independence, and London was in the grip of an IRA bombing campaign. Many thought A Sense of Ireland would never happen, and, to most who remember, it is regarded as a miracle not only that the show went on, but that it turned out to be a huge success.

That success can be evaluated in many ways: logistically; the creative programme; the audience response; the media response; the consequences for Irish artists; the lasting effect on Irish and London Irish cultural life; and even its influence upon political relations on these islands.

For the first time, and over 30 years later, ‘A Sense of Ireland’ will be evaluated in public by the festival’s Programme Director, John Stephenson, in discussion with Gerard Mannix Flynn.

‘Metanoia’ by Mark and Paula Sutherland

©Mark Sutherland

This somatic landscape imprinted by place
it bears the scars of all who reside here
our language invisible beneath the surface of this skin
cannot silence the whispers of our ancestors
who call us to recognise the past
which will determine your future
but silence them I will as the present is full of lies
as there is no power in truth only momentary liberation
before the body is shackled by your gaze and you look
upon this landscape to make your judgements
allowing your prejudices to seep into this space
polluting the dialogic connections as you seek
no thing and find no thing only the roots to our politics
which imprison ideas until our bodies are beaten down
by the structure of self and others but still
your scopophilic judgements make me weep
the tears of many that there is still no change to see
and you are a fool to believe the past is invisible
as it roars around my skin and yet you do not hear
as I tell you all stories are here scratched across the body
as it journeys to others and grips the present
urging us to believe that theirs is a finite truth
and power is dressed up as order so that we morph
into one collective amnesia and pretend it never was
© Paula Sutherland

Photos: Mark Sutherland
Text: Paula Sutherland

Meet the Artists
July 25th – 30th

Alannah Robins, an Irish artist based in Connemara Co Galway. She will be running the Marathon Irish show during the opening weekend of the Olympics and installing a new piece of work. 

July 20th – 25th

The Dublin based artist Wendy Judge will be running the space and will be available to meet people.

July 11th – 20th

Maedhbh Mc Mahon will be running the gallery until Friday 21th July.  Gallery opens Thursday – Saturday 11am -5.30pm and Sundays from 1pm to 5pm

August 15th-21st Anita Corcoran


Anita Corcoran will be running the Marathon Irish show from August 15th-21st.

Anita Corcoran is an animator and designer from County Louth.
She has been based in London for the past two years, where she has been working as a freelance animator on both short films and commercial projects.
She works as a character animation in both CG and 2D animation.
Her work can be viewed on www.anitacorcoran.com.

Limerick Printmakers Pop-up-First Thursday 2nd August


Limerick Printmakers Studio & Gallery Pop-up display on August 2nd

The prints in this suite are a showcase of the diverse range of work our studio members produce. From Mike Byrne’s graphic monochrome silkscreen to Clare Gilmour’s textured and layerd collograph and photo etching there are a variety of styles from the contemporary to the traditional, in technique and concept. 19 artists have taken part, making two prints each, totaling 38 in the full suite.

This body of work is the inspiration of Dietrich Blodau. Dietrich established and was head of the Print Department in Limerick School of Art and Design, Limerick Institute of Technology, for many years and is a hugely influential figure in the printmaking community in Limerick. Throughout the years Dietrich has worked in the Druckwerkstadt Print Workshop, in Berlin and the work will travel to the Druckwerkstadt Print Workshop, in Berlin to be opened by the Irish Ambassador HE Dan Mulhall at 8pm on the 14th September.